RELIGIOUS AND MIGRATION IN THE 21ST CENTURY: WOMEN AND MIGRATION IN THE AFRICAN CONTEXT

5Six Catholic Religious Congregations at the United Nations, namely; Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur, Congregations of St. Joseph, Franciscans International, Augustinians International, Passionists International and VIVAT International are collaboratively sponsoring a two-day workshop in Nairobi, Kenya, from June 6-8.    This is part of an effort by these Catholic Religious congregations/NGOs at the UN to educate and empower their members at the grassroots on the very crucial issue of migration and human trafficking. The theme of the workshop is; “Women and Migration in the African Context: Religious and Migration in the 21st Century

Read more:

Women and Migration in the African Context: http://bit.ly/2pGFXYt

International Organization for Migration: http://gmdac.iom.int/

Global Migration Trends Factsheet by the International Organization for Migration: http://bit.ly/2nJo1iy

 

UNITED NATIONS DECLARATION ON THE RIGHTS OF THE INDIGENOUS PEOPLES: MEASURES TAKEN TO IMPLEMENT THE DECLARATION

4Representatives of indigenous communities from around the world gathered in New York from April 23rd to May 5th for the 16th United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues.  This year’s forum was particularly special because it marked the 10th anniversary of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of the Indigenous Peoples. Discussions at the forum were focused on measures taken by the international community, Member States of the UN and all stakeholders to implement the Declaration. The forum acknowledged progress by some member states in realizing the rights of indigenous peoples since the adoption of the Declaration ten years ago, but also expressed concerns about lack of implementation by many countries.

 

Read more:

UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues: http://bit.ly/1ompreW

Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples; http://bit.ly/2rB8qDM

Draft report on the 16th Session: http://bit.ly/2q4Qm0e

PARTICIPANT VOICES AT THE 61ST COMMISSION ON THE STATUS OF WOMEN: SNDATUN DELEGATES

By Eileen Burns SNDdeN; Executive Director, Notre Dame Education Center, Lawrence, MA,2 US. When you take a tour at the United Nations, they explain to you that you are no longer in any country but are standing in international territory owned by all of the nations. It struck me forcefully how needed the UN is to have a spot-on earth dedicated to conversations, to dialogue leading to actions in the pursuit of peace. The 61st session of the Commission on the Status of Women was held in New York from March 13th to the 24th and about 8,000 delegates came from across the planet to participate. The theme was “Women in the Changing World of Work.” We are so blessed to be an accredited non-governmental organization at the UN, and Sr. Grace Amarachi Ezeonu is representing us well. I was able to attend plenary sessions in the General Assembly hall as well as multiple parallel events sponsored by many countries and side events sponsored by civil society organizations.  It was a great gift for me to attend and I encourage others among us to consider participating next year.

There is a place                                               Ideas and actions tried were shared

That defies boundaries                                 Many faiths, no faith, women gathered

Where all are invited                                     The Spirit moves within

To show their face                                           The dreams that were dared

 

Women gathered at the UN                            How long, O God, how long?

Coming from near and far                              Till strong women, weak women, all women

To focus on gender equality                           Are valued and cherished

And ask how and when                                   For who they are as they sing their song

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Gabriell Pascarella and Nahnsejay Mouwon are both Student Nurses at the Seton Hall University-College of Nursing, South Orange, NJ, USA.                                                                             

3By Gabriell Pascarella: My experience attending the United Nations 61st Commission on the Status of Women was definitely one that I will never forget. We were greeted by the many waving flags representing countries from all over the world. Once inside the UN we viewed our first exhibit. There was a wall of accomplishments made by women. Its purpose was to show advancing women’s leadership and its importance. Along with this wall of accomplishments, were the photos of the many strong women around the world. After viewing this exhibit we were able to attend some separate side events.

The first side event we attended had to do with the effects that alcohol has on women both physically and emotionally. In this session, we listened as representatives from the country of Botswana talked about different ways in which they are combatting this problem. The speakers discussed the linkage between alcohol and violence, as well as the linkage between alcohol and HIV. Some of the statistics they shared were very eye opening. Most of those affected are young women. Attending this side event made it clear that there are many issues going on in the world that we need to bring more attention to.

The next side event that we attended was my favorite event of the day. The topic of this event was the importance that the role of family has in a woman’s life. We first heard from a speaker who focused on the relationship between a woman and her father. He spoke about how the media and certain celebrities cast a dark shadow over the father-daughter relationship, when in reality, there are statistics to show all of the benefits this relationship can provide in a woman’s life. At many points the speaker himself, as well as the audience, became emotional thinking of their own personal father-daughter relationships and its importance.

The next speaker at this event focused on the family unit, and how parents should teach4 their children, especially their daughters, about good character. She spoke about how in schools’ children are taught a wide variety of topics, but none of them include how to have good character. I believe this side event was one of the most important because it spoke about issues that many in the room could relate to. It also brought up the point that we need to enlist more men in the fight to women’s equality. Many of the points and recommendations they touched upon are things that I will bring back to my own family unit.

I am so honored to have taken part in this amazing experience. With such a strong interest in women’s healthcare it meant a lot to see some of the issues that women face all over the world. It gave me the determination to help combat many of these issues, and I will most definitely share my experience with the many women that I encounter.

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 By Nahnsejay Mouwon: As a global intergovernmental body, the United Nations promotes gender equality and the empowerment of women; something that I truly admire. During the 61st Commission on the Status of Women, I learned more about the promotion of women’s rights, how to document and speak to the reality of women’s lives throughout the world. The idea of shaping global standards on gender equality and the empowerment of women is something that I believe worth global discussion, and at such, I feel honored to be part of such discussion.

5Thanks to the UN for giving hope to women and children around the world, helping them to gain courage to make the world a better place. This conference provided the right platform to talk directly to youth and women issues. As a person who is passionate about women rights and gender equality, I am determined to teach others what I learned from the conference. I have already started to speak about some of the major topics outlined during the conference. I believe that when women start to actively engage policy makers regarding gender equality, sexual violence and other women related topics, the world will become a much better place.

 

 

COLLABORATING FOR GOOD: VISIT FROM THE CONGREGATIONAL LEADER OF SISTERS OF NOTRE DAME DE NAMUR TO SNDatUN OFFICE

1By Teresita Weind SNDdeN, Congregational Leader, Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur. There is a big difference between talking about the problems of the world and being sucked into a hole of hopelessness; and being with people determined to meet and collaborate for positive changes for the good of our planet and peoples. Sister Grace Amarachi Ezeonu, SNDdeN, our NGO representative at the United Nations, chose a few events for us to attend while I visited her at the UN during the first week of Easter. The three events focused on positive change, featuring Youth Voices on Substance Abuse; Academic Panelists addressing The Rise of Nationalist Politics and Policy Implications for Migration; and an Interactive Dialogue on Harmony with Nature. Grace Amarachi is in the seventh month of this ministry at the UN, working with colleagues and committees at the UN, and reaching out to include contacts with our Provinces for Social Justice. Our Congregation is grateful for the attention Grace Amarachi is devoting to positive change and healing in our wounded world. Thank you, Grace Amarachi.

 

WORLD WATER DAY: “WHY WASTE WATER?”

InicefMarch 22, was the World Water Day. This year, the United Nations asks the world, “Why Waste Water?” According to a UN source, over 1.8 billion people around the world use sources of drinking water contaminated with faeces. This puts them at the risk of contracting cholera, typhoid, polio, dysentery, and other water-borne diseases. Women UNICEF/NYHQ2012-2002/Shehzad Nooran in many parts of the world still walk for miles to get water for domestic use, this sometimes expose them to the danger of attacks or sexual assault. Many girls in rural communities also miss school because they have to walk long distances to fetch water.

Access to safe and clean water is a human right. In 2015, the 193 Member States of the SDG 6United Nations adopted the 17 Sustainable Development Goals which includes access to “Clean Water and Sanitation” (Goal 6). SDG target 6.3 requires us by 2030 to “improve water quality by reducing pollution, eliminating dumping, and minimizing release of hazardous chemicals and materials, halving the proportion of untreated wastewater and substantially increasing recycling and safe reuse globally.” When next you leave your tap or shower running for too long, recall the UN question: “Why waste water?” Click here to download a Fact sheet on water.

2017 COMMISSION ON THE STATUS OF WOMEN: “WOMEN’S ECONOMIC EMPOWERMENT IN THE CHANGING WORLD OF WORK”

61st commissionOver 8,000 women from all walks of life and from different parts of world converged at the UN headquarters in New York from March 13-24 for the 61st Commission on the Status of Women (CSW). The theme for the 2017 Commission was “Women’s Economic Empowerment in the Changing World of Work.”

In his opening remarks for the event, the UN Secretary General, Mr. Antonio Guterres, thanked and welcomed all the women to the United Nations headquarters. He commended the women for raising their voices for women’s equality and dignity around the world, and reaffirmed his commitment to gender parity in the United Nations system. Below is an excerpt from Mr. Guterres’ welcome speech at the CSW61:

“In a male dominated world, the empowerment of women must be a key priority. Women already have what it takes to succeed. Empowerment is about breaking structural barriers. Men still dominate, even in countries that consider themselves progressive. Male chauvinism blocks women and that hurts everyone.

 We are all better off when we open doors of opportunity for women and girls; in boardrooms and classrooms, in military ranks and at peace talks, in all aspects of productive life.”

 

 

 SNDatUN Office had eight delegates to the CSW61. Read the Outcome document from the CSW161 here.

Read more: About CSW61 http://bit.ly/2fkuuvH

UN Secretary General’s Opening remarks for the CSW61; http://bit.ly/2mCppAR

 

2017 INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY: “WOMEN IN THE CHANGING WORLD OF WORK: PLANET 50-50 BY 2030”

International Women’s Day was commemorated on March 8, around the world. The theme for the 2017 celebration was “Women in the Changing World of Work: Planet 50-50 by 2030.” In his speech to mark the event, the United Nations (UN) Secretary General, Mr. Antonio Guterres, noted, “leadership positions are still predominantly held by men.” He also remarked that “outdated attitudes and entrenched male chauvinism are widening the economic gender gap.” According to Mr. Guterres, “tradition, cultural values and religion are being misused to curtail women’s rights, to entrench sexism and defend misogynistic practices.” He again stressed that denying women and girls their rights “is not only wrong in itself; it has serious social and economic impacts that hold us all back.”

Also in her opening remarks at the Youth Forum of the 61st Commission on Status of

UN Woman

Photo:  UN Women/Joe Saade/Gaganjit Singh

Women (CSW 61), the deputy Secretary General of the UN, Ms. Amina Mohammed, thanked the young women for their enthusiasm and positive contributions to the society. She noted, “Every day and in every way, women must be celebrated as caregivers, mothers, business and political leaders, as agents of change, and as pioneers for equality.”                                                                                 

Ms. Mohammed further stressed, “where women and girls are held back or subjugated, the society suffers, when they advance, the society advances with them.”

More on:  Ms. Mohammed’s presentation click here.  Mr. Guterres’ remarks;  http://bit.ly/2mCppAR