UNITED NATIONS CLIMATE CONFERENCE (COP23): CALL TO HOLD TO PARIS CLIMATE AGREEMENT PATH

4 Two years into the adoption of the Paris Climate Agreement, the United Nations Climate Change Conference, (COP23) was held in Bonn, Germany, from December 6 to 17. Against the background of the  horrific natural disasters around the world in recent months, there was a unified call by participants at the Conference to “hold to the path of the Paris Climate Change Agreement.” The effects of climate change are undeniably being felt by billions of people around the world, especially those already living in the most impoverished, vulnerable parts of the globe. For people living in Small Island Countries, the impacts of climate change are daily realities as they watch their homes gradually submerge in water.

In his opening remarks at the COP23, the UN Secretary General, Mr. Antonio Guterres5 described climate change “as the defining threat of our time.” It is therefore, our duty — to each other and to future generations — is to raise the ambition to combat it.”

The conference ended on Friday, November 17, with participants expressing a renewed sense of urgency and the need for greater ambition to tackle climate change.

Read more;

United Nations Climate Change Conference: http://bit.ly/2yr0tFB

Draft Outcome Document: http://bit.ly/2yY1RvC

 

 

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GOOD NEWS FOR THE PEOPLE AND PLANET: PARIS AGREEMENT ENTERS INTO FORCE

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The threshold for entry into force of the Paris Agreement was reached on October 6, 2016. To date, 76 of the 197 Parties have ratified the agreements of the Convention. The current status for the Agreement stands at 191 Signatories and 81 Parties. With the required 55% of total global emissions reached, the Paris Agreement will now enter into effect on November 4, 2016.

This motion will mark the beginning of a long journey and the collective commitment of the international community towards saving our planet. Click here to see the countries that have ratified the Paris Agreement. Read more: http://bit.ly/245GrVi

CLIMATE CHANGE: A CONTINUING CHALLENGE

  • “The principle of subsidiarity is a two-sided coin that calls for decisions to be made by the  Flower rock
    smallest unit possible, but the largest unit necessary. This sometimes requires governments to intervene when smaller units are unable or unwilling to make just decisions, especially in the case of abusing the environment.” Meghan Clark, Professor at St. John’s University
  • On June 12, the 6-month anniversary of the Paris Agreement, faith communities around the world will come together to escalate the call for action on climate change. Join them: sacredearth2016.org/ (English and Spanish)
  • Watch “Amazonia: Dorothy Stang’s Struggle”: bitly/1rKvAEi (available in 16 languages)
  • Read about forced migration of small island nations due to climate change: “Countries of the world need to start thinking seriously about how many people they’re going to take in,” says Michael Gerrard. “The current horrific situation in Europe is a fraction of what’s going to be caused by climate change.” law.columbia.edu/magazine/613512/the-rising-tide
  • Our beautiful earth is a gift to be protected. Watch the stunning video “Creation Calls”: com/magnificent.html

Sustainable Development Goal 13: Protect Our Home

 

CLIMATE CHANGE: SHED YOUR LIGHT ON THE DARKNESS

CLIMATE CHANGE: SHED YOUR LIGHT ON THE DARKNESS

Waitomo caves

The Waitomo Glowworm Caves in New Zealand are known for their thousands of glowworms on the ceiling. A species found exclusively in New Zealand, Arachnocampa luminosa survive with no sunlight. Organized tours of the caves include a boat ride along the Waitomo River underneath the glowworms whose lights reflect and sparkle on the water. Boats float along silently since the glowworms turn themselves off when there is too much noise. Wouldn’t it be wonderful if humans could automatically turn themselves off when they produce too much noise, too much consumption, too much ozone, too much ecological damage?

The UN Framework Convention on Climate Change meets in Paris at the end of this month. Participating nations will make significant progress in combating climate change if they boldly choose to eliminate unsustainable modes of production and consumption. When localities and individuals also take action to create a viable future for people and planet, the Waitomo glowworms will be the first to thank us.

  Learn More:UN Peace art

 

CLIMATE CHANGE: THE DEFINING ISSUE OF OUR TIME

XiuhtezcatlWatch Xiuhtezcatl, an impressive indigenous climate activist and Youth Director of Earth Guardians, address the UN General Assembly on the issue of Climate Change (29 June 2015).  http://bit.ly/1HKh1Hg

“Youth are standing up all over the planet to find solutions,” he said. “We need you to take action. We are all indigenous to this earth.”

 

There are no passengers on spaceship earth. We are all crew.
Marshall McLuhan

CLIMATE CHANGE: SENDING SIGNALS TO THE PUBLIC AND THE PRIVATE SECTOR

Alla 1 cropBy Alla Baranovskaya, Intern in SNDatUN Office  

The recent High-level Event on Climate Change at the UN was an incredible opportunity to understand the issue about climate change better from the perspective of governments instead of the more familiar one of social media. The event helped to determine at which stage different countries are currently standing when it comes to preparation for the December political forum on this topic in Paris, France. I’ve noticed that one of the main focuses that was common for most of the countries’ governments was to “send signals” to private sectors and the public in general. It is one thing for people to see breaking news on TV how climate change is affecting the world and how it will destroy our planet before the next generations after ours grow old. The other thing, however, is for us to understand where we the people are standing in this situation, what we need to change in our ways of living, and how much we need to input, so the outcome can make the difference. Contrary to people in general, the private sector has big aims in particular because they are the ones who have money and who can financially help good and crucially necessary causes. However, the causes need to be specified and explained. This is how the “sending signals” technique is taking priority over any other technique and this is the reason many governments have absolutely agreed about it.

Time is limited. Time is what we are mostly talking about here. If glaciers melt before we take appropriate actions there will be nothing that we can do. Governments all agree that each one of their inputs is inevitable in order to save this planet. However, governments could not cover all the necessary expenses and needs while the private sector is not trying to do anything differently, but, in contrary, making this problem accelerate with time. Therefore the real solution is hidden in that message that private sector needs to get from a legitimate institution, such as the government of one’s country. If this message, or in other words “the signals”, are being delivered properly, stating the points accurately and providing explanations, the private sector will have no choice left but to participate and take some kind of action. At first sight the action one private company can potentially take might not seem like big input to solve the problem; however, when all those private companies add up the result will be seen, and hopefully, as a result, the world can reduce climate change to its goal point: limit warming to less than two degrees Celsius.