INTERNATIONAL DAY FOR THE ERADICATION OF POVERTY: “COMING TOGETHER WITH THOSE FURTHEST BEHIND TO BUILD AN INCLUSIVE WORLD OF UNIVERSAL RESPECT FOR HUMAN RIGHTS AND DIGNITY”

1The United Nations commemorates the International Day for the Eradication of Poverty on 17 October every year.  The theme for the 2018 celebration is, “Coming together with those furthest behind to build an inclusive world of universal respect for human rights and dignity.” Over 700 million people worldwide still live in extreme poverty, that is, on less than $1.90 a day (World Bank). In addition to economic exclusion, people living in poverty also suffer social and political exclusion. They often do not have a voice in the formulation of policies that impact their lives. And, as the saying goes, “if you are not at the table, you are on the menu.” So, International Day for the Eradication of Poverty offers opportunity for people living in poverty to take the floor to speak on their experience of poverty. To mark the event at the UN, people living in poverty from within and outside the US were invited to address the global body on some of the challenges they encounter.

In his opening remarks at the event, the UN Secretary-General, Antonio Guterres, noted2 that; “Ending extreme poverty is not a matter of charity, but a question of justice.” He further stressed that “poverty is not inevitable, it is not a natural state of being or occurrence.”  But as he pointed out, “poverty is often the outcome of choices that society makes.” Studies have shown that it is possible to eradicate extreme poverty in this century, if governments have the political will to dedicate the required resources to building human capital and providing social services. Through the adoption of the Sustainable Development Goals in 2015, world leaders made the commitment to eradicate extreme poverty in their respective countries. It is now the responsibility of citizens of every country to hold their governments accountable to this commitment.

As the UN marks the 70th anniversary since the adoption of the “landmark document” on human rights, the Universal Declaration of Human of Rights, it is important to highlight the connection between poverty and human rights. Access to services such as basic healthcare, education, housing, clean water, and sanitation is a human right that governments are obliged to provide for the people.

Learn more:

Watch the event for the International Day for the Eradication of Poverty at the UN: https://bit.ly/2yowM66

To End Extreme Poverty by 2030, We Need to Tackle Inequality:  https://bit.ly/2OJwfoq

World Bank September, 2018, Press Release on Extreme Poverty: https://bit.ly/2OxyqIl

 

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SOCIAL PROTECTION SYSTEMS: TOOL FOR REDUCING EXTEREME POVERTY AND INEQUALITY

5The World Banks defines extreme poverty as living on less than $1.90 per day. The organization estimates that about 10.7% of the world’s population or 760 million people still live in extreme poverty. World leaders made a commitment in 2015 through the adoption of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to eradicate extreme poverty by the year 2030. SDG 1 calls for an “End to Poverty in all its Forms Everywhere.” Access to Social Protection or social security has been identified as key to achieving SDG 1. Therefore, SDG 1:3 states that governments “implement nationally appropriate social protection systems and measures for all, including floors, and by 2030 to achieve substantial coverage of the poor and the vulnerable.” As described by the International Labour Organization (ILO), Social Protection or social security are set of policies and programmes designed to reduce and prevent poverty and vulnerability across the life cycle. This includes nine main areas: child and family benefits, maternity protection, unemployment support, employment injury benefits, sickness benefits, health protection, old-age benefits, disability benefits and survivors’ benefits.

The Director-General of the ILO, Mr. Guy Ryder, notes that “when access to essential benefits and services is guaranteed for mothers and children, for persons with disabilities or illness, for the elderly and unemployed, countries actually make their economies resilient while ensuring the human rights to social security.” Unfortunately, only 1 in 5 people around the world have access to universal social protection coverage as indicated in the 2017 – 2019 World Social Protection Report. Governments must therefore, recognize that providing social protection for the people is not only the right and just thing to do, it is actually a very economic smart thing to do. Countries that have made efforts in expanding their safety net programmes have seen a rapid decline in the rate of poverty and experienced economic growth.

Read more:

ILO World Social Protection Report 2017 – 2019: https://bit.ly/2CyyaTn

Infographic : https://bit.ly/2BbsTV2

SOCIAL PROTECTION SYSTEMS: TOOL FOR REDUCING EXTEREME POVERTY AND INEQUALITY

5The World Banks defines extreme poverty as living on less than $1.90 per day. The organization estimates that about 10.7% of the world’s population or 760 million people still live in extreme poverty. World leaders made a commitment in 2015 through the adoption of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to eradicate extreme poverty by the year 2030. SDG 1 calls for an “End to Poverty in all its Forms Everywhere.” Access to Social Protection or social security has been identified as key to achieving SDG 1. Therefore, SDG 1:3 states that governments “implement nationally appropriate social protection systems and measures for all, including floors, and by 2030 to achieve substantial coverage of the poor and the vulnerable.” As described by the International Labour Organization (ILO), Social Protection or social security are set of policies and programmes designed to reduce and prevent poverty and vulnerability across the life cycle. This includes nine main areas: child and family benefits, maternity protection, unemployment support, employment injury benefits, sickness benefits, health protection, old-age benefits, disability benefits and survivors’ benefits.

The Director-General of the ILO, Mr. Guy Ryder, notes that “when access to essential benefits and services is guaranteed for mothers and children, for persons with disabilities or illness, for the elderly and unemployed, countries actually make their economies resilient while ensuring the human rights to social security.” Unfortunately, only 1 in 5 people around the world have access to universal social protection coverage as indicated in the 2017 – 2019 World Social Protection Report. Governments must therefore, recognize that providing social protection for the people is not only the right and just thing to do, it is actually a very economic smart thing to do. Countries that have made efforts in expanding their safety net programmes have seen a rapid decline in the rate of poverty and experienced economic growth.

Read more:

ILO World Social Protection Report 2017 – 2019: https://bit.ly/2CyyaTn

Infographic : https://bit.ly/2BbsTV2

POVERTY AND INEQUALITY: DRIVER OF VIOLENT CRIME IN ANY SOCIETY

02By Juliana Marques Boyd: There has been a significant increase in violent crimes in many cities around the world in recent years. According to the  United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime 2013 Global Study on Homicide, over 437,000 people were intentionally killed in 2012. The fundamental question remains: what causes our society to be so violent? Though many attribute violent crimes to factors such as mental illness, alcohol and drug abuse, it can be inferred that inequality and poverty are the greatest drivers of violence. A recent World Bank study indicates that the inequitable distribution of income contributes to a feeling of unfairness among disadvantaged individuals which leads them to seek compensation through criminal activities. The study also states that crime is determined by a ‘cost-benefit analysis.’ For instance, when the poorest people have fewer or sometimes no economic opportunities and there is a profound income gap between the rich and the poor, they tend to seek financial compensation through crimes such as robbery and kidnapping for ransom. The study suggests that rapid poverty alleviation programmes would lead to a decrease in crime rates in various countries .

Inequality occurs when wealth is concentrated in the hands of very few individuals. Poverty caused by inequality is a major threat to public security and its presence undermines the achievement of sustainable peace and development. In his departing speech to the UN General Assembly in 2016, President Barack Obama warned that, “a world where 1% of humanity controls as much wealth as the bottom 99% will never be stable.” This fact was highlighted in a report presented by OXFAM to the world economic and political leaders at the 2017 World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. The 4report revealed that only eight men own wealth equal to the combined wealth of 3.8 billion people who make up the poorest half of humanity. This report warns that left unchecked, growing inequality threatens world peace and security, and undermines the fight to end poverty. Large corporations and the super-rich are also reasons for widening income inequality, according to the report. It argues that by having low-cost labor, paying little taxes, optimizing revenues to their shareholders, and influencing and ensuring that regulations work in their favor—corporations accumulate large sums of fortune at the cost of the well-being of the general population. The report ultimately suggests that in order to reverse this trend, it is necessary to design a “human economy,” which emphasizes better societies and benefits to the larger portion of the population.

To break the cycle of inequality and poverty so that the next generation can live in a peaceful and sustainable world, it is vital for both the local and national governments, as well as the international community to ensure access to social services and economic opportunities, especially to minority communities who often are the most marginalized. The UN 2030 Agenda provides the framework for governments to achieve a just and equitable society by 2030. And this is possible in our lifetime!

Read more: Inequality and violent crime; http://bit.ly/2FpfhYN

An economy of 99%; http://bit.ly/2EYEdTH

“It’s been proven, less inequality means less crime;” http://bit.ly/1y6Bsc0

56TH COMMISSION FOR SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT: “STRATEGIES FOR ERADICATING POVERTY TO ACHIEVE SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT FOR ALL”

1The Commission for Social Development concluded its 56th session on February 7 with the adoption of four draft resolutions by consensus. The draft resolutions, which were recommended to the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) for further actions, included ageing, future-working methods of the commission, strategies for eradicating poverty, and Africa’s development. The Commission on Social Development is the advisory body responsible for the social development pillar of global development. The draft resolutions are measures created by government officials and civil society leaders to help lift millions of people still living in poverty, especially those in vulnerable situations. In her opening remarks at the commission, the UN deputy Secretary General, Ms. Amina Mohammed, stated that, “at the global level, we have experienced impressive reductions in extreme poverty. Significant progress has also been made in improving access to schooling and healthcare, promoting the empowerment of women, youth, and persons with disabilities, older persons and indigenous populations; however, the drop in extreme poverty remains uneven across regions, within countries and between various social groups.”

The Commission for Social Development was also actively partaken by members of Civil2 Society organizations. Many NGOs submitted written or oral statements to contribute to the work of the Commission. Additionally, many of the participants co-sponsored side events on relevant issues. Members of the Civil Society held their Forum on February 2, under the theme, Social Protection, Including Floors: A preeminent strategy to eradicate poverty and achieve social development for all.” The Civil Society Forum provides a space for members of Civil Society Organizations to gather for orientations, discussions, and collaboration on the themes and deliberations of the Commission for Social Development. The group submitted a joint statement on the theme of their Forum to the Commission.

In his closing remarks, the chairperson for the 56th Session of the Commission, Mr. Nikulas Hannigan of Iceland, commended efforts by the Secretariat, the Vice‑Chairs, keynote speakers, and a range of other participants for contributing to the smooth and successful conclusion of the eight-day commission.  He also affirmed what he described as the “unprecedented robust level of participation by civil society.

Read more: 56th Commission Social Development: http://bit.ly/2Bt7Mgl

THE CALL TO END POVERTY: A PATH TOWARD PEACEFUL AND INCLUSIVE SOCIETIES

2Extreme poverty is a violation of human rights. On December 22, 1992, the United Nations (UN) General Assembly, in resolution 47/196, declared October 17 as the International Day for the Eradication of Poverty. The theme for 2017 celebration is, “Answering the Call of October 17 to end poverty: A path toward peaceful and inclusive society.” The observance of October 17 was inspired by the Call to Action by Father Joseph Wresinski; founder of International Movement ATD Fourth World, a nongovernmental organization that aims to eradicate extreme poverty through human rights based approach. Since the adoption of this resolution, some progress has been made toward global poverty eradication. Yet, significant work towards this goal remains.

There are sufficient resources in the world for fair allocation to every individual, yet3 millions of people live in extreme poverty. This occurrence is because only a handful of the world’s population controls the bulk of the world’s resources, leaving the majority of the world’s population in poverty. A recent report by Oxfam International clearly illustrates this sad situation.  According to this report published by Oxfam in January 2017 titled, An Economy for the 99%, eight men own the same wealth as the 3.8 billion people who make up the poorest half of humanity. This is simply not acceptable! As stated by the former President of the United States, Barack Obama, to the UN General Assembly in 2016, “a world where 1% of humanity controls as much wealth as the bottom 99% will never be stable.”

In 2015, world leaders under the auspices of the United Nations made a commitment to eradicate extreme poverty by 2030 by adopting the Sustainable Development Goals, with the eradication of poverty as its first goal.

Read more:

UNSG message on poverty:  https://youtu.be/GQ_ehELVScY

An Economy for the 99%: http://bit.ly/2jXPgES

Poverty is Political: These 3 Things Will Help Us Eliminate It: http://bit.ly/2yzT31B

WOMEN’S WORLD BANKING: A SUCCESS STORY

Women's World BankingWomen’s World Banking (WWB), a microfinancing network of 39 financial organizations from 28 countries, invests in low-income women entrepreneurs. Women lift their families out of poverty, improve their situations, and educate their children when given access to financial services. Success stories like WWB are powerful reminders of how creative partnerships can help achieve the Millennium Development Goals, especially eradicating poverty.

Watch WWB’s short video at http://bit.ly/10T1TgL and participate in their efforts at www.swwb.org/